How to manage your star employees

Employees are what drives a business — and that’s why businesses are always competing for the best talent.

Industry professionals have estimated that up to 90% of an enterprise’s value is driven by its intellectual capital, but you don’t need to rely upon such abstract estimates. It’s already known that the average employee costs six to nine months of their salary to replace.

With all this in mind, it becomes necessary for CEOs and managers to focus on both acquiring and supporting their best employees. Unfortunately, model employees tend to disappear beneath the problem employees, making them feel unwanted and undervalued.

It’s a CEO’s job to ensure that all employees feel satisfied and recognised — especially the ones that are doing the most for the business.

Foster your team relationships

The Pareto Principle tells us that the top 20% of our employees will complete 80% of the work. By the same token, the bottom 20% of our employees will take up 80% of our time. This is what can cause a solid employee to disappear under a morass of more difficult ones. But when you manage a business, you aren’t managing just the top employees or just the bottom employees; you’re managing them all as a team. There will always be overachievers and underachievers, but you need to work with all of them effectively.

When employees work together, they are more likely to feel rewarded by a task successfully completed. Team-building exercises and corporate events can be used to further deepen and build upon these relationships, in addition to the foundation that a strong sense of company culture provides. A sense of camaraderie and team spirit is often enough to make employees feel like a valuable member, but the danger is that they may also feel as though they aren’t being rewarded for their direct and unique contributions.

Recognise and reward individual employees

Creating a company culture of recognition is important. But rewards don’t necessarily need to involve money. In fact, both public and private recognition are often rated more highly. Employees don’t just want to feel directly recognised; they also want to feel as though they have a future with the organisation and that they will continue to develop their career. What’s more, while 24% of employees found recognition from their CEO the best, 28% found recognition from their direct managers preferable.

Communicate with your employees through bi-weekly meetings

Regular one-on-one meetings, even quick stand-up meetings to check in, are a great way to tell your employees what they’re doing correctly and to get any feedback on what managers may be doing wrong. Many companies are blindsided by employees who appear to leave suddenly, when the departure really wasn’t sudden at all. The employee was simply never given the opportunity to directly address their concerns. When given a chance, most employees will be straightforward about their own goals with the organisation and what the organisation could be doing to better serve them.

Training and development opportunities

Employees today are not loyal to their companies; they are loyal to their careers. If they feel as though their careers aren’t advancing at the rate they expected, they’re more likely to jump ship. The solution is to offer a steady stream of training and development opportunities. Employees want to be able to do their jobs well; this gives your top-performing employees their time to shine.

Training and development directly benefit the organisation itself. As employees become more effective, they become more efficient at their tasks and more capable of operating autonomously. Though the company may need to invest directly in these training and development opportunities, they will ultimately achieve a substantial return on their investment.

Employees may also be given the opportunity to engage in transfer of learning, through which skills are diversified and employees are able to cross-train in different fields. Employees who are able to train in multiple fields are far more likely to be effective, as they are able to quickly adapt to the positions that the company requires. Transfer of learning is how some of the top CEOs are able to be so effective. It is also instrumental in grooming top-performing employees for management positions.

By improving your employee retention, not only can you reduce your hiring costs, but you can also boost your employee satisfaction by up to 22%. Though this isn’t an easy task, it can be achieved by building a company culture of employee recognition from the ground up. As a CEO, managing your employees is a balancing act; you need to be able to reward your outstanding performers while still managing the employees who are struggling. Mentorship and advisement can help. Through TEC, you can connect with other entrepreneurs and CEOs who are facing the same hurdles and developing their own employee management strategies. For more information, contact TEC today.