How to manage employee retention: Lessons from Marsh & Partners

More than 75% of the CEOs of Fortune 500 companies were promoted from inside of the organisation. Whether they were promoted on the basis of a family dynasty, through merit, or a combination of both, CEOs have an average of 16 years of experience within their organisation. In fact, approximately one-third of these CEOs are ‘lifers’ — individuals who have worked from the bottom up within their company.

Regardless of industry, people are a company’s most valuable asset and investment. The best CEOs don’t just have prior experience with their companies — they continue to grow, learn, and self-analyse within them. These CEOs will be true leaders; they will be able to inspire loyalty and consistently acquire the best work from their employees.

Bronwyn Condon, managing partner of Marsh & Partners, has worked with the firm since her graduation from college. As managing partner of the accounting firm, she has focused both on developing a strong team and fostering individual relationships with her employees. By focusing on employee development, mentorship, and opportunities for growth, she has been able to build a company culture of trust and loyalty, and she has been able to deliver the best in talent to her firm’s clientele.

Analyse your turnover 

Australia has seen increasingly high staff turnover rates in the last few years. In fact, staff turnover rose 29% year-over-year in 2016 alone. Modern employees have more options, which is leading to more job-hopping and more job-hunting. Not only is high staff turnover inefficient and expensive, but it can also disrupt the continuity of service that customers have come to expect. Employers need to be able to procure and retain the top talent: otherwise they will only find themselves caught in a ceaseless treadmill of employee training.

Every time a business needs to replace an employee, it costs approximately six to nine months of that employee’s salary. A significant portion of this is wrapped up in training, during which time the new employee will need to adapt and grow into the role. But that isn’t the only cost of high turnover. Companies with high turnover rates also lose their best employees — the employees who are most likely to build value for the business.

Business leaders need to be willing to analyse their turnover rates and identify areas in which the business may not be performing to its full potential. A significant portion of employee turnover is due to management; when management styles conflict when an employee’s goals, the employee will often leave. Marsh & Partners has devoted itself to the hiring of individuals who fit into their people-centric business model. To that end, they have focused on hiring individuals who are proactive self-starters and who can align with the company’s culture.

Support each staff member

Every staff member is unique. They have their own career goals and personal desires. It isn’t only the responsibility of the employee to support the business; it is also the responsibility of the business to support the employee. Employees will leave when they feel that their career is at a standstill, when they aren’t able to devote enough time to their personal lives, or when they feel ignored or unrecognised by their management. It is your job as a leader to resolve these issues to avoid losing talents.

To that end, Bronwyn was able to create a comprehensive mentorship program at Marsh & Partners to ensure that the goals of her employees aligned with the goals of the business. By helping her employees reach their own personal goals, she ensured that they were able to dedicate enough time to producing the best.

Employees will put much more into their work when they feel valued — and building this type of relationship with an employee starts with empathy and self-analysis. Mentorship programs cut both ways, by giving newer employees access to expertise and guidance whilst ensuring that senior employees remain connected and engaged.

Find a peer network

True leadership requires constant improvement. Just as new staff members may need senior mentorship, business leaders often need expert feedback in order to continue to grow. Connecting to a peer advisory network gives a leader the opportunity to see things from a different point of view. Peer networks can offer key insights into the strategies of other industries and can offer vital third-party, neutral analysis. By being exposed to different management styles and business strategies, a leader will be able to develop beyond the confines of their own company.

Through TEC, Bronwyn was able to further her development as a leader and partner in Marsh & Partners. One-to-Ones with Bronwyn’s TEC mentor fulfilled a valuable need for her own mentorship, through which her concerns and issues could be voiced to an experienced third party. Through this partnership, Bronwyn was able to work through many solutions for her business, make better decisions and personally develop her own leadership skills. Self-analysis is incredibly important for all leaders. No one is infallible, and every leader serves as an example for their employees.

Through TEC, leaders can begin transforming themselves and, in so doing, transforming their businesses for better results. Contact TEC today to begin your own journey.