4 tips to running effective meetings

From stand-up scrums to sit-down sessions, meetings take up a large portion of time for any organisation. When managed effectively, a meeting is an opportunity to optimise business operations. But when managed poorly, meetings become disruptive and distracting.

It’s estimated that $37 billion a year is wasted on meetings that are unnecessary — and meetings themselves can offer a false sense of productivity that gets in the way of legitimate accomplishments.

What’s the difference between an effective, powerful meeting and a waste of time? It often comes down to leadership.

Leaders are what set the tone and course of a meeting; they are the ones who decide whether a meeting is necessary, what format the meeting should be in, and how long the meeting should take.

As a leader, you need to take steps to make sure your meetings are living up to their potential.

1. Create a highly structured agenda

Meetings tend to bounce from one topic to another as related concerns arise and an extemporaneous discussion begins. While this type of exploration can sometimes be useful, it’s more often distracting.

Creating a highly structured agenda will keep your meeting focused on the issue at hand. When creating an agenda, ask yourself:

  • What are the goals of the meeting?
  • Who is necessary for the meeting?
  • When is the best time for the meeting?

Expand on your agenda with a thorough outline of the meeting’s discussion topics. A narrow, specific agenda is the most useful agenda; the broader your meeting topics are, the less likely you are to be able to get anything substantive done.

2. Only invite those who belong to the entire agenda

A shorter, smaller meeting is almost universally desirable. Additional members will only expand the scope of a meeting, encouraging it to run longer and reducing its capacity to focus.

Meetings should be as short as possible and should be limited to attendees who are necessary. If team members feel that the meeting is not relevant to them, they will often become distracted. They may even derail the meeting entirely, in an attempt to bring it towards topics that are more relevant to them. Even if they remain silent, their time will still be wasted.

Irrelevant meetings burn out employees — and over time, they encourage employees to ‘zone out’ during meetings even when they are relevant to them. Improving the relevancy of your meetings is the first step towards ensuring that employees are attentive and alert.

3. Stick to the agenda

It’s easy for unexpected issues to arise during a meeting. After all, team members may find themselves suddenly in the room with a large number of people who could solve the problems that they’re currently encountering.

This encourages them to discuss issues that are relevant to their current tasks. But for a meeting to remain efficient, it’s important to avoid being side-tracked.

When an issue that’s not on the agenda does arise, acknowledge it and have it recorded. Make it a point to discuss it in subsequent meetings.

Ensuring that the issue is properly acknowledged is important; otherwise, team members may feel as though they have been brushed off.

Likewise, it’s important to schedule a meeting to discuss the issue if it is a valid one, as otherwise people could forget about the issue.

4. Debrief and follow up

Once the meeting is over, give an overview of the key points the team has discussed and the information that has been gained throughout the meeting.

If it is desirable to get undirected feedback, set aside a time at the end of the meeting for meeting members to address any of their additional concerns.

A report should be compiled to include the meeting’s minutes, and team members with newly assigned projects or tasks should be followed up to make sure they’re on track.

Ideally, every team member involved in the meeting should walk away understanding the issues raised, the solutions presented, and their role in implementation. Written documentation will further improve the process as team members will be able to refer back to the documentation later.

As a leader, you have the unique ability to direct the meeting — and an effective meeting is all about direction. Keep your agenda close, and you’ll be able to keep the meeting on track and moving swiftly.

But meetings aren’t just about structure and process; they’re also about practice and experience. Connecting with other leaders is an excellent opportunity to acquire tips from others. Contact TEC today to find out more about connecting with a peer group of thousands of leaders, entrepreneurs, and mentors.

Making decisions with disagreements

When it comes to business strategies and problem-solving, not everyone shares the same perspective. Before a decision can be made, it’s not uncommon for a disagreement to occur. As a leader, it’s your role to manage these disagreements without letting them disrupt the flow of your organisation.

Sometimes, it’s not always important, or even possible, to make the best decision when you don’t have all the information regarding a certain issue. It’s more important that the decisions are made and that they are made with due consideration. You can achieve this by creating a decision-making strategy and by following these best practices:

Leave emotion out of it

A disagreement can easily become personal. After all, each professional is defending their own point of view, which stems from a combination of their own knowledge and experience. But everyone has their own perspective and no single individual can understand all aspects of a situation. It’s important to remain professional and to leave emotion out of the decision-making process.

Not only can introducing emotions ultimately confuse issues, but it can also reduce the impact of any points you are trying to make. Being clear on facts and clearly justifying your decisions is necessary not only for the best possible outcome, but also to ensure that employees understand your reasoning and do not feel ignored or pushed aside.

Appreciate all suggestions

It’s very easy to dismiss suggestions either as being outlandish or something that you’ve already considered. But rather than making a quick decision and potentially undermining your employee’s confidence, you should instead explore the idea and walk them through your own thought process. Be open to ideas that you might have otherwise dismissed; there may be some components that you haven’t considered.

By being a good listener, asking questions, and trying to see everyone’s point of view, you can create a positive and cooperative atmosphere. Employees will be more willing to share ideas, and ideas that are truly innovative and creative will be more likely heard. Being a primary decision maker is often like being an investigator; you need to explore all of the data before drawing a conclusion.

A failure to consider your employee’s ideas, even when they are truly unsuitable, can eventually lead to frustrated employees who feel unappreciated. When employees offer their ideas, they are trying to help. When that help is ignored, they often feel personally rejected. Moreover, it can make employees hesitate when they truly do have a good idea, as they may feel as though they won’t be heard.

Keep the consequences of your decision in mind

By necessity, each suggestion during a decision-making process needs to be explored to its conclusion. Once the brainstorming is over, each potential decision should be thoroughly outlined, and the consequences of that decision should be thoroughly investigated. The following questions should be asked:

  • What are the potential results of this decision?
  • What complications could arise due to this decision?
  • Who will this decision affect positively or adversely?
  • What will be the ultimate cost, in time and money, of each decision?

It’s possible that you may not know which decision will perform better. It may be something that is truly unknowable, such as a scenario that relies on too many factors, or it may be a decision that requires additional information before it can be made. Either way, if a decision must be made at this time, then the potential consequences not only need to be acknowledged but they also must be prepared for.

In business, it is possible that a decision may need to be made without all of the information present. Because of this, you may need to simply choose the best out of all possible solutions and plan contingencies in the event that there are negative consequences.

Compromising often doesn’t produce the best results

When we were children, we were often taught to compromise. It made sense because compromising is a fantastic way to build relationships with friends and family. But compromise is not a fantastic way to run a business. As a CEO, you need to make decisions that are optimal, not acceptable. Compromise ultimately results in both parties getting a little of what they want and a little of what they don’t need. Compromise leads to two dissatisfied parties and a weakened overall strategy.

CEOs may feel the compulsion to compromise when it comes to important business decisions, especially if tensions and emotions are running high. But when it comes to business, it’s almost always better to set a solid course rather than trying to split multiple strategies. A CEO needs to carefully study when compromise is and isn’t appropriate, and practice mediation in lieu of compromising their decision-making process.

Make better decisions through positive leadership

As CEO, you have already been selected to lead your company. Your company has put its faith in your decision-making abilities for a reason. Part of that reason is because you make well-considered, well-crafted decisions. As long as you are not making every decision in the company, it’s your prerogative to override others.

But it isn’t always that simple, especially when tensions run high or the right decision may not always be obvious. During those times, you may want to reach out for mentorship. TEC provides direct access to leaders and business owners who have experience moderating the decision-making process and ensuring that the right decisions are made day after day. Contact TEC today to find out more. 

How to have difficult conversations with employees

In an interview with 200 executives, it was discovered that 53% of executives admitted to avoiding difficult conversations because they felt they didn’t have the training or the experience to handle them. Of those who avoided conversations, 97% did so because of the stress that it caused them — and 80% were concerned that the conversation would escalate into anger. The role of a CEO is no different; difficult conversations with employees are stressful. Unfortunately, they are still necessary.

Being able to tackle difficult situations in the workplace is a defining characteristic of a CEO. A true leader doesn’t just manage difficult conversations; they excel at turning difficult conversations towards a positive goal. But all of that takes experience and self-awareness. Here are some of the key factors to mastering difficult conversations with employees.

Set the right tone 

It’s important to start any conversation with a positive tone — otherwise, you can easily put your employee on the defensive. Handling a difficult conversation is very much about reducing the emotions that are in play. An emotional person will not be receptive to your feedback and your direction. There are many things that can influence the tone of a conversation:

  • Environment. Being ‘called into the office’ can be stressful in and of itself, and it’s important to understand that your employee is already going to have their guard up. Consider an alternative approach, such as walking up to your employee and asking them, ‘Would you mind having a talk with me in the conference room?’ For difficult conversations, neutral territory may be best.
  • Body language.It can be difficult to control your body language, especially if you yourself are upset or frustrated. As a CEO, your employees are going to take their cues from you; if you seem agitated and upset, they will be as well. Keep your body loose and relaxed, avoid any aggressive movements, and take some time to just breathe.
  • Mindset. What is your ultimate goal for this encounter? If it’s a combative one, then the encounter will probably be combative. Your mentality going into a difficult conversation should be to ask about the other person’s point of view and to work together to find a solution.
  • Opening. Your opening sentence should be inclusive rather than, ‘I need to talk to you about something,’ say ‘May we talk about something?

It’s important to align yourself with your employee so that you can work together during the conversation. While you may feel that the employee themselves is a roadblock or that they have caused a situation, it is still true that you and the employee are going to need to work together and resolve it. As a CEO, this bigger picture will override any smaller frustrations.

Be clear about the issue, but don’t oversimplify the problem

Effective leaders are able to convey complex topics in simple terms, but that in itself can be an art form. When describing an issue, CEOs need to achieve a balance between being concise and being clear. There can be a temptation to oversimplify an issue — either to get the conversation over with or to gloss over some of the negativity. Unfortunately, that gives the employee an incorrect perception of the issue. They may not treat it appropriately or even take it seriously. Eventually, this leads to frustration, as the leader perceives a problem that the employee still does not.

  • Don’t go into unnecessary detail. When describing an issue, discuss only the facts that are pertinent to the employee — and only give enough for the employee to both understand the issue and understand the desired outcome. The employee doesn’t need to know the intricacies of the situation. They need to know what to do to complete their work more effectively.
  • Ask questions to determine whether the employee fully understands the issue. What is clear to you may not necessarily be clear to the employee; after all, you have more data to work with regarding the situation than they do. Rather than assuming that the situation has been resolved at the end of the conversation, ask the employee questions — such as what they will do next to resolve the problem.

Communication is all about clarity, and clarity often requires brevity. Complex situations should be distilled into a few concise statements; this will ensure that the employee will understand the issue and be able to appropriately tackle it.

Prepare for the meeting, but do not rehearse

As a CEO, it’s likely that quite a lot of your life involves preparation. The more prepared you are, the better the outcome. Having difficult conversations is no different. Before you tackle a difficult conversation, you need to have as full an understanding of the situation as possible. You should understand the facts of the situation, be able to articulate why it is an issue, and have suggestions for moving forward.

But preparation is far different from rehearsal. When you’re concerned about a conversation, it would be easy to go over it many times in your head. But eventually you would end up developing a script — and scripting can be dangerous. When you operate from a script, you stop listening to the other person. You are no longer able to effectively communicate with them and answer their questions. Instead, you’ll find yourself going back to your script, again and again.

Avoiding rehearsal will make it easier for you to connect directly to your employee and to listen to them. Remember: your prior knowledge may not always be accurate, and you may not always have a full picture of the situation. Being open to your employee means that you can be open to changing your preconceptions and open to solutions that may differ from the ones that you had previously devised.

Know your objectives, stay positive and future focused

It’s easy to get derailed through the course of a conversation, especially a difficult or defensive one. This may involve becoming bogged down in arguing details rather than looking at the bigger picture. Rather than seeking to position themselves at an indefensible point (such as whether or not a project was delivered late), defensive employees may begin to argue finer points (such as who was responsible for delivering a specific part of the project late).

This can be avoided by remaining positive, staying on track, and focusing on the future. It’s always possible to argue what has happened in the past; it is less possible to argue about what needs to happen going forward. Practically speaking, the major concern is not who was guilty or culpable; it’s being assured that the situation will not occur again.

Regardless of the content of the discussion, it must always end with a clear, concise goal for the future. This is what gives your employee something to focus on moving forward.

Master the art of conversation

As a leader, you have to be able to tackle difficult conversations head-on. Developing this talent will serve you well throughout your career, and will lead to better business outcomes throughout your organisation.

It can be difficult to face frustrated or aggressive employees, especially when you are perceived as opposition rather than help. Luckily, you’re not alone. TEC’s network of experienced, knowledgeable CEOs can help give you tips that have served them well throughout their tenure, developing your social skills and building up your network. Contact TEC today to find out more.

What makes a good mentor? Thoughts and ideas from Richard Appleby.

Here at TEC, we know just how important mentoring is. But, what truly makes a good mentor? TEC Chair Richard Appleby has written this piece for us to share his thoughts on the subject:

In my experience, it's all too easy to have a mentoring relationship that ends up being a "nice chat" type format, where the nitty gritty of how you can actually help a mentee develop begins to fall by the wayside. So, what makes a really successful mentoring relationship?

1) The best mentors ask the great questions

There's as much significance in what someone doesn't tell you as what they do say.

It's important to always question your mentees – if they've got a particular issue, ask them what the options are, how they think it will play out, what they need to put in place to make something happen. Too often mentees think it's about asking what the mentor thinks, what we would do if we were in our mentee's position. But the reality is we're not in their position, so we've really got to make them think.

Part of this is being able to listen. We need to understand what our mentee is talking about, to know how to read between the lines – there's as much significance in what someone doesn't tell you as what they do say. Then, you can find a way of asking the great questions that will get them to open up to the things they're not telling you. Great listening will also enable you to understand your mentees' strengths and weaknesses.

The best mentors will ask the great questions.The best mentors will ask the great questions.

2) Consider what your mentee wants out of the relationship

It's important to have a degree of formality. You and your mentee need to sit down and work out what the objectives of these meetings are and really find out where your mentee wants to go. Once you've defined what success will look like at the end of the process, you can develop a plan of exactly how you're going to get there. This introduces a level of accountability to the process that will steer it away from this "nice chat" model.

3) An holistic approach works best

I believe a really great mentor teaches people how to approach the whole journey, to be holistic and therefore long term and strategic. In the past, mentors have enabled me to understand the need to take on extra responsibility to help me get to where I want to be, and to show myself that I have the passion, integrity and skills to get there.

A great mentor in my life taught me the value of ethics.A great mentor in my life taught me the value of ethics.

If your mentee isn't looking at the bigger picture, they're going to find it difficult to succeed.

They've also taught me the value of ethics. In business, it's all too easy to cut corners, but if you're really going to develop you've got to stay true to your ethics. This involves being strong of character and resilient.

I'll always remember the time I was working for a company and there was a supplier who had been trying to do the right thing by us, but had gotten it wrong and cost us money. My mentor at the time taught me how important it was to focus on the fact that they were trying to do the right thing, and they were really trying to add value – even if it didn't work out, you need to appreciate this.

This holistic approach has also been important when I've helped mentees. I see a lot of young people come to me and they're desperate to be an entrepreneur, but they're not looking at the whole picture. They might have a really nice product, but is there a demand for it, is it solving a problem? If your mentee isn't looking at the bigger picture, they're going to find it difficult to succeed.

Richard Appleby has been a member of TEC for almost 10 years and a chair since 2015. His mentoring has helped countless managers and executives to succeed. Click here to find out more about becoming a CEO mentor.

How to manage employee retention: Lessons from Marsh & Partners

More than 75% of the CEOs of Fortune 500 companies were promoted from inside of the organisation. Whether they were promoted on the basis of a family dynasty, through merit, or a combination of both, CEOs have an average of 16 years of experience within their organisation. In fact, approximately one-third of these CEOs are ‘lifers’ — individuals who have worked from the bottom up within their company.

Regardless of industry, people are a company’s most valuable asset and investment. The best CEOs don’t just have prior experience with their companies — they continue to grow, learn, and self-analyse within them. These CEOs will be true leaders; they will be able to inspire loyalty and consistently acquire the best work from their employees.

Bronwyn Condon, managing partner of Marsh & Partners, has worked with the firm since her graduation from college. As managing partner of the accounting firm, she has focused both on developing a strong team and fostering individual relationships with her employees. By focusing on employee development, mentorship, and opportunities for growth, she has been able to build a company culture of trust and loyalty, and she has been able to deliver the best in talent to her firm’s clientele.

Analyse your turnover 

Australia has seen increasingly high staff turnover rates in the last few years. In fact, staff turnover rose 29% year-over-year in 2016 alone. Modern employees have more options, which is leading to more job-hopping and more job-hunting. Not only is high staff turnover inefficient and expensive, but it can also disrupt the continuity of service that customers have come to expect. Employers need to be able to procure and retain the top talent: otherwise they will only find themselves caught in a ceaseless treadmill of employee training.

Every time a business needs to replace an employee, it costs approximately six to nine months of that employee’s salary. A significant portion of this is wrapped up in training, during which time the new employee will need to adapt and grow into the role. But that isn’t the only cost of high turnover. Companies with high turnover rates also lose their best employees — the employees who are most likely to build value for the business.

Business leaders need to be willing to analyse their turnover rates and identify areas in which the business may not be performing to its full potential. A significant portion of employee turnover is due to management; when management styles conflict when an employee’s goals, the employee will often leave. Marsh & Partners has devoted itself to the hiring of individuals who fit into their people-centric business model. To that end, they have focused on hiring individuals who are proactive self-starters and who can align with the company’s culture.

Support each staff member

Every staff member is unique. They have their own career goals and personal desires. It isn’t only the responsibility of the employee to support the business; it is also the responsibility of the business to support the employee. Employees will leave when they feel that their career is at a standstill, when they aren’t able to devote enough time to their personal lives, or when they feel ignored or unrecognised by their management. It is your job as a leader to resolve these issues to avoid losing talents.

To that end, Bronwyn was able to create a comprehensive mentorship program at Marsh & Partners to ensure that the goals of her employees aligned with the goals of the business. By helping her employees reach their own personal goals, she ensured that they were able to dedicate enough time to producing the best.

Employees will put much more into their work when they feel valued — and building this type of relationship with an employee starts with empathy and self-analysis. Mentorship programs cut both ways, by giving newer employees access to expertise and guidance whilst ensuring that senior employees remain connected and engaged.

Find a peer network

True leadership requires constant improvement. Just as new staff members may need senior mentorship, business leaders often need expert feedback in order to continue to grow. Connecting to a peer advisory network gives a leader the opportunity to see things from a different point of view. Peer networks can offer key insights into the strategies of other industries and can offer vital third-party, neutral analysis. By being exposed to different management styles and business strategies, a leader will be able to develop beyond the confines of their own company.

Through TEC, Bronwyn was able to further her development as a leader and partner in Marsh & Partners. One-to-Ones with Bronwyn’s TEC mentor fulfilled a valuable need for her own mentorship, through which her concerns and issues could be voiced to an experienced third party. Through this partnership, Bronwyn was able to work through many solutions for her business, make better decisions and personally develop her own leadership skills. Self-analysis is incredibly important for all leaders. No one is infallible, and every leader serves as an example for their employees.

Through TEC, leaders can begin transforming themselves and, in so doing, transforming their businesses for better results. Contact TEC today to begin your own journey.

 

4 Insights into what great CEOs do differently

When less-than-optimal leadership costs businesses as much as 7% of total sales each year — what’s the difference between a good CEO and a great CEO? A good CEO is an important part of any successful business. A great CEO, on the other hand, doesn’t just lead — they inspire and contribute to an impactful business.

Here are the four key traits in particular that separate the good CEOs from the great ones. 87% of professional leaders, who either become or aspire to one day to become a CEO, deliberately develop the following four qualities. They may seem simple, but the key lies in the consistency of application that delivers the best results time and again.

1. Great CEOs make decisions with conviction

A great CEO understands that more often than not, it’s not about making the best decision possible — it’s about being decisive with conviction. It’s less about making the perfect decision and more about making decisions when they’re needed and acting without doubt.

A common trait among CEOs with the highest IQ is that they often struggle with making fast decisions as they’re much more likely to weigh the pros and cons of every situation. This leads to indecision and ambiguity, which invariably creates a bottleneck.

Great CEOs know that the expectation of ‘perfect information’ is an unrealistic one on the best of days; you need to make decisions quickly with conviction. If any signs of doubt are exhibited, employees will quickly start to lose faith in their leaders.

2. Great CEOs know how to measure impact

Regardless of the business you’re running or even in the industry you’re operating in, success more often than not comes down to your ability to deliver results. A great CEO never focuses too much on their vision without understanding the precise impact of that vision and which metrics will ultimately be used to measure its success.

To that end, it should come as no surprise that CEOs who are deftly able to engage their stakeholders’ needs are 75% more successful in their role than those who aren’t.

To be a great CEO, you need to be aware of not just the impact of what you want delivered — but also the impact you’re making when you deliver the results or engage with the people who have a stake in the game.

This idea even plays a role in how you interact with people on a daily basis. Remember that employees will always magnify your reactions. If you grimace when someone is telling you their ‘next big idea’, they might immediately think you hate it — or worse, think they’re being fired.

Along the same lines, good CEOs will allow employees to vote in the direction of the company. Great CEOs will allow them to have a true voice in the matter, albeit with the understanding that the consensus-driven decision is not necessarily the one that will be made. Knowing how to measure impact — in this case, the difference between listening to the input of employees because you’re afraid of being disliked versus making an unpopular move because you know it’s the best one — is something you’ll need to focus on if you want to move up to ‘great CEO’ status.

3. Great CEOs adapt proactively

Everything about your business is changing regularly — from the marketplace you’re trying to serve to your industry to your organisation at a basic level. CEOs who are able to adapt to changing times and evolving needs are roughly 6.7 times more likely to succeed than those who do not.

For a great CEO, adapting proactively is less about being able to successfully handle today’s challenges and more about dividing your attention between short and long-term thinking. Devoting as much of your time as possible to thinking about the long-term direction of things makes it easier for you to not only recognise signs of change and mitigate risks ahead of time, but it also creates a business that operates with a growth mindset as well.

4. Great CEOs deliver reliably

Good CEOs make promises. Great CEOs keep them.

To be a great CEO, you need to demonstrate results. This means that you need to show you cannot only recognise what needs to be done to move a business forward, but actually do it. It should come as no surprise that CEO candidates who are twice as likely to deliver results than average are much more likely to actually be picked for that role.

To get better at this, learn how to set realistic expectations upfront. Focus on establishing business management systems including dashboards, accountability, performance monitoring, and more. All of this allows you to build a much more stable bridge between where you are today and what you promised you would do tomorrow.

One of the major reasons that CEOs sometimes don’t deliver expected results is because they don’t have the tools in place when they need them the most. In fact, 60% of CEOs make the rookie mistake of not having the right team in place quickly enough. Words are cheap — actions are more expensive. From the business management solutions you employ to the teams you surround yourself with, all of this helps you deliver what you need, when you need it, no exceptions.

From good to great

The fact of the matter is that the gap between a good CEO and a great one is often created less as a result of any one major move and more because of a series of small ones. Knowing how to make decisions with conviction, knowing how to measure the impact of actions both large and small, being able to adapt to a naturally fluid environment, and knowing how to deliver what you promised are all major leadership traits that you should be focused on.

If you’d like to find out more information about the major qualities of a great CEO, or if you’d like to learn more about similar leadership insight topics, please don’t hesitate to contact us today. 

 

5 Leadership styles and when to apply them

An effective leader motivates and guides employees, targeting their strengths and weaknesses so that both the employees and the organisation can succeed. The relationship between leadership styles and employees, therefore, plays a crucial role. Despite of this, surveys have shown that 75% of employees voluntarily leaving their positions leave because of their bosses, leading directly to issues of talent retention and churn.

Surprisingly, 36% of organisations don’t have a formal leadership development strategy — considering that to be a good and effective leader, one needs to be highly adaptable. Depending on a project, the environment, and even the psychology of the employee involved, leaders may find themselves switching between leadership styles quite frequently.

It all starts with a solid knowledge of the five major leadership styles.

Facilitative leadership

Facilitative leadership is a people-centric leadership style that puts the work process and company culture first, ideal for creative and high-pressure environments.

A facilitative leader works to build trusting relationships between leaders and employees in order to achieve their mutual goals. Facilitative leaders learn as much as they can about their employees and how they work, give clear expectations of their employees, and encourage them as they achieve these goals. Facilitative leaders are positive and motivational.

Ideally, employees should feel that they are valued and that their work matters; they should feel as though they are being listened to and that they know what to expect.

Facilitative leadership is often used best within creative and skill-based industries, in which a more rigorous or structured type of leadership style could lead to roadblocks and stress. Facilitative leadership puts people first and thus ties very strongly into people-first company cultures. It is best used when employees are already invested in producing the best work that they can for the organisation.
 

Laissez-faire leadership

Laissez-faire leadership is a hands-off leadership style that puts all members of the team in control, ideal for exceptional employees and self-motivated teams.

In a laissez-faire leadership, a leader provides very little guidance to their team. Instead, they trust that their team understands their own roles and will be able to perform their best. Statistically, laissez-faire leadership is often considered to be the least productive type of leadership — but this is usually when it is improperly applied. When applied correctly, laissez-faire leadership actually reduces much of the red tape surrounding organisational administration and can produce very rapid and effective results.

A tightly connected team full of self-starters may thrive under laissez-faire leadership. All individuals need to be personally motivated and highly competent. Laissez-faire leadership is best used when each individual member has an expertise and skill set that the leader themselves may not necessarily grasp. In this situation, over-managing employees could become more disruptive than helpful.

 

Coaching leadership

Coaching leadership creates a give-and-take atmosphere that puts a heavy emphasis on two-way communication, ideal for developing long-term and stable communication.

Sports teams are an excellent example of how a well-balanced coaching leadership style is put into effect. In a coaching leadership, the leader sets out clear goals and responsibilities for their team. However, the leader also listens to their team and provides constant communication. Leaders will provide feedback regarding an employee’s role and accomplishments and will listen to any concerns that employee has. This fosters a very strong employee-and-leader relationship, which is more likely to yield stable and consistent results.

When competent and capable employees don’t seem to be giving their job the attention that’s needed, a coaching leadership can be used to delve into their psychology and to inspire and motivate. Coaching leaderships drill down to any potential issues within a team and inspire the team to work together. They are best used to develop long-term team structures and goals.

 

Authoritative leadership

Authoritative leadership is essentially a dictatorship that puts the leader in complete control, ideal for undisciplined or high-stakes environments.

Authoritative leadership is one of the least preferred by employees, but nevertheless, it can become necessary in a variety of situations. In authoritative leadership, a leader makes all the decisions and rarely considers the opinions of team members. Team members may rebel against this type of leadership style unless they feel that the consequences of rebellion outweigh the benefits. All the team’s goals, initiatives, and strategies will be developed solely by the team leader, with very little input. The psychology of authoritative leadership can be a bit rough, with employees feeling devalued and ignored.

Though it may sound like a bleak atmosphere, authoritative leadership can become necessary when there has been a complete breakdown in structure. During times of transition or crisis, an authoritative leadership style may be necessary to make rapid-fire decisions and to keep a team together. Authoritative leadership is generally not intended for long-term use but instead as a short-term tool.

 

Democratic leadership

Democratic leadership is a type of leadership that puts an emphasis on the free exchange of ideas, ideal for most balanced working environments.

This is one of the most versatile types of leadership style. In a democratic leadership, team members are consulted regarding major decisions and projects. Communication consistently occurs between leaders and team members, and input from every individual is considered valuable.

Many teams have a tendency to default to some form of democratic leadership policy. However, it isn’t without its flaws: a democratic leadership process does take longer, and projects and teams can be stalled by a weak link.

Democratic leadership works best in strong, homogenous teams of accomplished and competent individuals. This is a solid ‘default’ leadership style, though it is particularly useful when time is not at a premium. It may need to be abandoned in times of crisis or looming deadlines.

 

All about the balance

There is no one leadership style that is going to carry you through all the teams, projects, and environments that you will encounter. Instead, the ability to effortlessly switch between these leadership styles as necessary is what makes for an effective leader. A business with satisfied and motivated employees will be able to retain the best talent and experience limited churn.

But merely knowing about these leadership styles is not enough: you also need to be trained in them. Contact TEC today to get started.