4 ways to improve the people elements of strategic planning

Strategy and people

This is a great time of year for you to either come up with or review you professional objectives or personal goals and how they fit with some of the grander strategic goals for the business. It’s a chance for you work out which of your priorities are really critical for yourself and for the organisation.

Planning for an organisation’s future involves not just creating a strategy but also managing the human resources necessary to actually implement it. However, you also need to take responsibility for yourself.

  1. Sit, reflect and be still

When asked what the first thing he will do when he leaves office, Barack Obama simply said he wanted to be still and reflect, and I think that’s something we need to do as well. From time to time, we should give ourselves the chance to reflect and think about priority goals for us and our businesses.

That includes – although it may sound cliched – thinking about things like what we need to do to stay innovative, what could disrupt us and how could we disrupt our own industry? Consider the steps you could take to prepare for these concerns and work out what you would have to do to start achieving them.

  1. Coach your direct reports

It’s all well and good for you to be across your strategy, but communicating that to your direct reports so it can cascade throughout the rest of the organisation is an ongoing discussion, not a one-off meeting or presentation.

Each month, you should sit down with these people for a coaching session where you’re not just telling them what to do, but actually providing guidance, listening to their concerns and helping them meet their goals. It’s an approach that links personal and professional goals, helping your team understand the options open to them and which ones are worth focusing on moving forward.

  1. Understand that there’s a deficit of trust in the world

Without getting too political, a few events over the past year heavily publicised an issue that’s affecting people at all levels: There’s a shortage of trust between people and their leaders.

I think the thing that’s really going to separate regular organisations from great ones over the next year or two will be the sense of trust they can cultivate. Employees and customers have lost trust in leaders on all fronts, from those in their place of work through to politicians and media leaders as well.

Each company will have to investigate its own unique concerns, but in general business leaders should be asking how they can ensure their employees trust them and what they need to do to grow and maintain that. The days of people listening to you purely because you are the boss are over, so you’ve really got to work to overcome that trust deficit that’s out in the world at the moment.

  1. What did you overlook last year?

Creating, communicating and implementing a strategy demands a significant personal investment. Not only have you got to manage your own personal productivity, you need to be on top of how the rest of the organisation is engaging with your strategic plans.

Consequently, it’s easy to let thing fall by the wayside. One of the first things that’s often neglected is communication because it seems like it’s just easier to do everything yourself. That’s an unwinnable game, because you just can’t take on that amount of work, you have to delegate to people you know can dissipate the message throughout the organisation.

The more you overload yourself and forget to communicate, the quicker it all spirals down to impact the rest of the people you rely on, consequently eroding that trust that’s so difficult to create in the first place.


Jerry KleemanBy: TEC Chair, CEO mentor and coach Jerry Kleeman

 

10 tips on goal setting to make you a better leader

Top 10 tips on goal setting

We recently interviewed some of our business mentors and coaches for their best approach to goal setting, staying motivated and striking the right balance between your personal and business life.

If you are ready to step straight into action, then these top tips will give you a head start on goal setting.

1. Clarify your purpose

One integral question we need to start off with when setting goals and achievement is why. This could be answered by your organisation’s mission statement or by clarifying your own role.

An important motivator for goals and achievement is to define your purpose. Capturing the entrepreneurial spirit in:

‘Reasons come first, results come second.’ – Peter Voogd

Some of the questions to ask yourself include:

  • Why is this goal important to me to achieve?
  • Why am I willing to make the necessary sacrifices?
  • Why am I able to keep going in the face of adversity?

Answering these questions will begin to craft your why, which becomes your purpose, and helps to give you clarity.

Tip from Trent Bartlett, you can read his full list here

2. Be organised

The first step to ensure you’re able to remain accountable is to be organised. This means being well aware of what you want to achieve, and creating a method to list and track your progress towards the eventual goal.

This is the perfect opportunity to investigate the many technological solutions that can make tracking goals easier. Many of the people I mentor use an app called Trello which tracks all the various “projects” they have on at any point in time. You can tick them off as you complete them and set target dates for completion to ensure you’re on track.

Tip from Graham Jenkins, you can read his full list here.

3. Know your business cycle

Your business cycle will offer a logical window for the best time to set your goals.  Find the most suitable time for yourself, your team and your customers to set goals.

Drawing up the goals and visions for your business is an activity based on passion, rather than process.  Think about your objectives in the context of upcoming opportunities, current market conditions or the changing circumstances of your business. This can bring breakthrough moments of setting goals in context.

Tip from Allyn Wasley, you can read his full list here.

4. Be resilient

Like everything in life, meeting goals involves sticking it out and dealing with the challenges that will inevitably arise along the way. Ideally, to stay resilient you’ll want to try and keep your emotions in check and avoid getting flustered if things don’t go exactly to plan.

How flexible you are able to be with your goals will also affect how easy it is to stay resilient. Be prepared to put some goals aside, add new steps or refocus altogether, as long as they continue to align with a key purpose or vision, you will keep heading in the right direction.

Tip from Richard Appleyby, you can read his full list here.

5. Don’t forget to set your personal goals for effective goal setting

The goals you have for your business aren’t the only directives that should shape the months ahead. All too often, senior executives make a plan for the new year that doesn’t account for their own personal goals.

Most leaders spend the majority of their time working tirelessly on the company, to ensure it achieves greater value for shareholders or competes better in its particular market. It’s easy to neglect your personal investment in these goals, the impact on your life as well as that of the company. Answering the question of why, will help you to find a balance.

Tip from Ian Neal, you can read his full list here.

6. Ensure your bank understands you

It always surprised me when businesses, small or medium-sized, don’t have a relationship with their bank that involves regular meetings and strong understanding about their current status, and expectations for the future.

Everyone needs a bank for a loan from time to time. Either things are going very well and businesses have consumed a bit of their cash with rapid growth or there’s been a hiccup and they need a safety net. If there’s a relationship in place, the bank is much more likely to come through.

If the people at the bank understand a business and its goals and trust the leader, they’re a valuable ally if you need extra financial help. The key is for leaders to have built this relationship far before they need assistance – and that means keeping in touch even when everything is just ticking over as per normal.

Tip from Jerry Kleeman, you can read his full list here.

7. Find someone to hold you accountable

Depending on the type of goal you’re focusing on, there are a number of people who can hold you to account and ask you for regular updates. A board of directors will have one set of expectations to meet, which may differ from those of your financial controller.

You may be looking for someone more impartial like a business coach or mentor who is aware of what you are trying to achieve but doesn’t have the same attachment to your business. They can hold you to account in a non-judgmental way while still ensuring you’re being pushed in the right direction.

Alternatively, get your family involved, as this is a way to have a positive balance of personal and professional goals, while focusing on objectives that won’t harm your relationships. Again, they offer a valuable perspective on your goals that’s separate from people based within the business.

Tip from Graham Jenkins, you can read his full list here.

8. Find opportunities for disruption

Keeping an eye on the future of innovation and disruption is imperative. This is a key business trend at the moment for good reason.

Be sure that someone in the company has time to look at the future with disruption in mind. Either within the leadership team or appoint someone to focus on the future.

Not only do they need to keep an eye out for what may disrupt them, but also ask “What could I disrupt?”. There’s always a chance, no matter how well a business is doing, for an incumbent company to wipe the rule book clear and set new standards for an industry. Then, it doesn’t matter how good a business is compared to its traditional competitors because the goalposts have moved.

Tip from Jerry Kleeman, you can read his full list here.

9. Give the year a theme

For me, every year is based around a theme that my various goals and objectives are nested under. This mean that when I write goals out, I already have a prompt and direction.

Theming also frames this process but it also does something I find just as powerful: As the year goes along and we all get busy, sometimes we lose track of our specific goals, so I find having an overarching theme in mind provides a constant level of focus.

It could be one word, phrase or sentence.

I normally stick to one or two words. For example, my most recent theme for last year was simply ‘business’, as I had been doing a lot of leadership and not-for-profit work and wanted to reorient more towards the business side of my career.

Tip from Helen Wiseman, you can read his full list here.

10. Find motivation

A bit of extra pressure is good for keeping you on track, that’s part of the reason why it’s so important to enlist other people who are invested in your progress. I found there’s a way to take this motivation to the next step with an app called Crew Mojo, which enables other people to follow your various goals and tasks with regards to upcoming deadlines.

Knowing other people are keeping an eye on your promised deadlines helps you take the process a bit more seriously while also creating a channel where you can update invested parties ahead of time if you think a certain timeframe is going to be particularly tough to meet.

Using traditional goal setting along with apps to keep track of your progress is an excellent way to keep momentum in your business and personal life. With the right balance, you can stay accountable and achieve your goals.

Tip from Graham Jenkins, you can read his full list here.

How to break free from tradition when setting goals

goal setting
Each time a new year begins it seems to trigger a wave of realisation for many business leaders. It sparks a need for people to both look back at what they achieved over the past year while also encouraging them to focus on their goals for the impending 12 months.

When you’re leading a medium sized business or establishing an empire as an entrepreneur, it can be difficult to step back for long enough to set some goals.

If you are personally driving your business on all cylinders, as an SME, here’s how to get the best out of your goals starting now.

  1. Know your business cycle

Many businesses are at their busiest at the start of the year. So the traditional approach of taking a step back at the start of the year won’t suit every business.

Your business cycle will offer a logical window for the best time to set your goals.  Find the most suitable time for yourself, your team and your customers to set goals.

Drawing up the goals and visions for your business is an activity based on passion, rather than process.  Think about your objectives in the context of upcoming opportunities, current market conditions or the changing circumstances of your business. This can bring breakthrough moments of setting goals in context.

  1. Focus on drive and dynamics

Leaders bring their own signature style and tempo to the business. It is time to switch on your own drive, vision and to build the aspirational goals for the business. Your goals need to be dynamic and driving, a source of motivation rather than something you have to find the energy to complete.

To do this, you need to be aware of the drive behind these goals. Leaders who really understand the purpose of their organisation and focus on why your business exists, often come up with the most meaningful goals.

To create a series of achievable goals that gain true satisfaction, it is worth your own drive, time and attention.

  1. Take your time

You can set a goal in thirty seconds. But is that objective one that’s been considered thoroughly? Does it show an understanding of where the environment is heading or what disruptions may take place over the next 12 months?

These are the types of questions that are easily overlooked if you treat goal setting as a mandatory process that you rush through. It’s important to be aware of both the challenges and opportunities that lie down the path that a goal may set you on.

This links back to the need to be aware of your purpose as well, as you may need to take the time go all the way back to questions of why you first started the business and what you were trying to achieve.

  1. Be prepared to reframe your goals

Your likelihood of being completely correct when setting goals may as well sit at zero per cent. You can never be fully sure what the future holds, so it’s important to be able to reframe your goals as the year goes on.

For example, I like to frame goals as being either aspirational, satisfactory or objectives you would be disappointed to not complete. This grading system means that as time passes, you don’t risk being demotivated by marking something that could be considered aspirational as a complete failure.

Knowing how to break free from tradition and find your purpose makes it much easier to stay motivated throughout the year.


By: TEC Chair, CEO mentor and coach AAllyn-Wasleyllyn Wasley

 

How to stay motivated and stick to your goals

stay motivated when goal setting
Goals are priceless if you have tools in place to keep you motivated and ensure you are accountable throughout the year. The more you can return to them, measure your progress and see how you’re tracking, the more likely you are to achieve them.

The key is to find out what motivates you. It’s a personal process, which means not every technique will necessarily speak to you. Here are some ways that might help you build a stronger focus on your goals in 2017.

  1. Set aside quality time

Many people rush through their annual goal setting, yet this is a precious exercise for yourself and your business. If you are able to turn your attention to the process, it really pays off.

Take the time to find value in the process, and understand what a greater focus on personal and professional goals could mean for your future success.

To stay motivated, you want your goals to hold meaning and give you a clear purpose. By using this time to understand your purpose, your goals are more achievable when life gets busier later in the year.

  1. Break goals down

Start with the broad goals, and break these down into smaller objectives that you can work towards. Then be sure to reward yourself and your team along the way to avoid losing motivation.

For example, if you want to build a new website for your business and don’t have the skills or resources to do so, the fear of failure can be off-putting. Instead, break the overall goal of having a new website down into milestones you can start to achieve.

Focus on what you can do today and ensure you reward success, even for the steps as you go. The ability to reward yourself as you make progress is a great motivator, and means a bit more than just ticking something off a list.

Also be sure to measure how far you have travelled, not how far you have to go.

  1. Work with the experts

With your list goals, you can enlist others to help you achieve them and keep track of how they are going.  This applies in both your personal and business goals.

Work out who will be the most helpful in working towards specific goals, whether that’s your partner, a colleague or an external advisor.

For example, say your personal goal is to set up a self-managed super fund. It is likely this will take a lot of unnecessary leg work to get right, so rather use your time to find a professional to make the most of your efforts.

If outsourcing helps you achieve your goal, do it.

  1. Be resilient

Like everything in life, meeting goals involves sticking it out and dealing with the challenges that will inevitably arise along the way. Ideally, to stay resilient you’ll want to try and keep your emotions in check and avoid getting flustered if things don’t go exactly to plan.

How flexible you are able to be with your goals will also affect how easy it is to stay resilient. Be prepared to put some goals aside, add new steps or refocus altogether, as long as they continue to align with a key purpose or vision, you will keep heading in the right direction.

Staying motivated is first and foremost in finding your purpose to achieve your goals. Be sure to have clearly laid out plans and a realisation that you can’t do it all on your own. And you will be well on your way to creating achievable goals to keep you motivated throughout the year.


BRichard-Applebyy: TEC Chair, CEO mentor and coach Richard Appleby

Effective goal setting: 4 common mistakes to avoid when setting goals

Effective goal-setting

Now is the ideal time for leaders to sit down to think about what they want their business to look like in a year’s time. Effective goal setting is not as simple as writing down large-scale objectives and hoping you achieve them.

Many people consequently make mistakes in this process, forgetting that goal setting is actually the first step in the process, to achieving desired goals. With this in mind, here are some of the most common mistakes that are easy to avoid with the right guidance:

  1. Don’t forget your personal goals for effective goal setting

The goals you have for your business aren’t the only directives that should shape the months ahead. All too often, senior executives make a plan for the new year that doesn’t account for their own personal goals.

Most leaders spend the majority of their time working tirelessly on the company, to ensure it achieves greater value for shareholders or competes better in its particular market. It’s easy to neglect your personal investment in these goals, the impact on your life as well as that of the company. Answering the question of why, will help you to find a balance.

  1. Misunderstanding your needs

Most of you will be familiar with Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, but how many of you are confident applying it to your everyday lives? As a leader, you need to be aware of how your position dictates your needs and shape your goals accordingly.

It’s almost a given that some of the lower levels of the pyramid such as physiological and safety needs will be taken care of, which means you can focus on more of the self-fulfilment needs that sit closer to the top. Achieving your potential through self-actualisation can really help you understand why you do what you do, and how you need to shape goals accordingly.

  1. These are not just your goals

Take the time to talk through your goals. Whether it’s your spouse, your children or other family members, talk through your ideas for the future. As these people may be just as affected by your decisions as you and have an invested interest.

For your personal goals, it can be as simple as regular date nights for you and your partner, or as grand as meeting savings goals and travelling more. The point is that it builds on that personal element mentioned above, and helps to build that why that links your objectives with that of the business.

For your business goals, you may want to find a mentor or business advisor to talk through your goals.

  1. Forgetting to be accountable

The other positive that stems from bringing family into the goal-setting process is that they can help you stay accountable. It’s not just you ticking off a list by yourself, it’s important people in your life asking ‘how are we going with our goals?’. This is especially important with regards to personal goals, as these people add just a bit of extra motivation and ensure your progress is being tracked.

It’s not just family that can keep you on your toes either. Sharing personal goals with a peer group or mentor, means you have yet another audience that isn’t afraid to ask you tough questions about your achievements as the year progresses. Maybe the friendly pressure of a surprise interrogation every now and again will result in the motivation you need to keep on track with your goals.

Overall it easier to set up goals that are achievable and to follow through on your promises by creating personal connections and genuine measures of accountability as the first step.


Ian NealBy: TEC Chair, CEO mentor and coach Ian Neal

Supercharge your goal setting with these tips, apps and hacks

goal setting tips
Find the right tools to help you stay accountable and achieve your goals

You can now boost your business and personal life by matching goal setting guidelines with the best online productivity tools and apps. By selecting the most effective goal setting tips along with collaborative apps you can keep track of your progress. In fact, it is an excellent way to keep momentum in your business and personal life. This could make you and your business unstoppable.

To ensure your goal setting for your business actually creates results, you need to track progress towards achievements as you go, rather than simply writing them down and stepping away.

Whether it’s self-directed or assisted by others, it’s essential you have processes in place that help you to remain accountable. Seeing your progress is an essential source of motivation, and means there are consequences if you’re not doing the right things to achieve your goals.

  1. Get organised

The first step to ensure you’re able to remain accountable is to be organised. This means being well aware of what you want to achieve, and creating a method to list and track your progress towards the eventual goal.

Investigate the many solutions that can make quantifying goals easier. There are many popular productivity apps, and the people I mentor often use Trello which tracks all the various projects they have on at any point in time. You can monitor tasks and set target dates for completion to ensure you are making progress.

Project management apps like Trello are not limited to a professional context either, one of the people I mentor added projects he wants to complete around the house. Essentially, it’s a tool for time management that can help you focus on both personal and professional goals.

On a side note, Trello has recently been acquired by Atlassian, you can read more about here.

  1. Find someone to hold you accountable

Depending on the type of goal you are focusing on, there are a number of people who can hold you to account and request regular updates. A board of directors will have one set of expectations to meet, which may differ from those of your financial controller who has a more operational focus.

In some cases, however, you may need someone more impartial like a business coach who is aware of what you are trying to achieve but doesn’t have the same emotional attachment to your business. They can hold you to account in a non-judgmental way while still ensuring you’re being pushed in the right direction and tackling that “too hard basket”.

Alternatively, get your family involved. This is a way to have a positive balance of personal and professional goals, while focusing on objectives that will add to your relationships. Again, they offer a valuable perspective on your goals that’s separate from people based within the business.

  1. Review your goals to ensure they’re achievable

Create goals that you can confidently work towards. Frequently, your first attempts at listing goals are closer to a draft than a working guide. Often these goals are about 90 per cent complete, so it’s important to come back and refine them after a bit of reflection.

Be sure to understand yourself first, determining what drives you. Think about the things that you intended to do last year, but didn’t. Are those things still important? Then determine what you want for this year. Draw up your goals and prepare an action plan. Then review these regularly.

Some of the questions that can help to refine the goals in the early stages are:

  • What is the big picture?
    • Clarifying your big picture becomes your theme
  • What are the best opportunities to pursue?
    • Opportunities give you the milestones you want to meet
  • Are these goals achievable?
    • Achievable goals become your targets
  • What steps do I need to take to achieve what I want?
    • Each step can become your mini projects
  • How do I track the progress of these goals?
    • These become actions you can carry out
  • Can others help me to achieve and check in on how I am going?
    • This helps to clarify who is your support, and if you need a mentor.

All of these questions can distil your goals into a plan that’s easy to account for as the months pass.

  1. Find motivation

A bit of extra pressure is good for keeping you on track. That’s part of the reason why it’s so important to enlist other people who are invested in your progress. I found there’s a way to encourage motivation with an app called Crew Mojo, which empowers individuals and teams to get stuff done with a culture of commitment and real-time feedback.

Knowing other people are keeping an eye on your promised deadlines helps you take the process a bit more seriously while also creating a channel whereby you can update invested parties ahead of time if you think a certain timeframe is going to be particularly tough to meet.

Using traditional goal setting along with apps to keep track of your progress is an excellent way to keep momentum in your business and personal life. With the right balance, you can stay accountable and achieve your objectives for the coming year.


Graham JenkinsBy: TEC Chair, CEO mentor and coach Graham Jenkins

Adding the why back into goal setting

goal setting tips

When it comes to goal setting, people are more likely to have business goals rather than personal ones.

My approach is to ensure leaders are able to recognise and manage the inevitable imbalance between achieving both work and life goals. People use popular frameworks such as SMART or Objective Key Results (OKR), often missing an important step, which is the why.

Whether your aim is business or personal goal setting, these tips are framed to help seek clarity and understanding the purpose behind goals.

It doesn’t matter which framework you use, as long as you know your reasons why your goals are important to you.

Clarity of vision

Goals are short term, visions are not. Goals are specific and quantifiable, while visions are broad, all-encompassing ideas of how you want your life or business. Visions capture how you want your goals to look, feel and even be.

Goals lack a deeper meaning if they are not paired with visions that provide purpose and significance. Setting goals without a vision is crazy.

Firstly, you should have a compelling vision that your goals are embedded within, which will drive more lasting and meaningful achievement and progress.

Inevitably, goals can become self-defeating if there is a myopic focus. Holding fast to a single vision enables adaptability and resilience to what is important in this fast changing and distracting world.

Clarity of purpose

One integral question we need to start off with when undertaking goal setting and goal achievement is why. This could be answered by your organisation’s mission statement or clarifying your own role.

There are two main reasons that setting a clear and compelling why is so powerful:

  • The first is inspired and purposeful action. Which means getting clear on why you are doing what you are doing. When you have a powerful why attached to your goals, you know exactly what and whom you are doing it for.
  • The other is sacrifice. When you have a powerful and compelling why, you will be much more likely to pay the price to achieve the goal.

The quote by Friedrich Nietzsche sums this point perfectly: ‘He who has a why to live for can bear almost any how.’

If you have not defined your purpose then you are missing one of the most important motivators for goal achievement. As entrepreneur Peter Voogd said: ‘Reasons come first, results come second.’

Some of the questions to ask yourself include:

  • Why is this goal important to me to achieve?
  • Why am I willing to make the necessary sacrifices?
  • Why am I able to keep going in the face of adversity?

Answering these questions will begin to craft your why, which becomes your purpose, and helps to give you clarity.

At all levels of organisations, role clarity is critical. Team members need to have a perfectly clear understanding of everyone’s role expectations of them and the reasons their roles exist in the organisation in the first place.

The responsibility to ensure the understanding of roles and create an effective team structure rests squarely with the leader.

Most importantly, however, especially for personal goals: Share them with family. A number of people use vision boards and all sorts of great tricks to direct their personal goals. Too many times when asked what their partner thinks, they’ve said ‘Oh no I haven’t shown them’.

These decisions and your goals affect their lives too. By having a joint purpose you gain an extra level of investment, and a new sounding board for further ideas and support.

Clarity of importance

The point of goals is not to successfully complete tasks we blindly set ourselves, nor is it to tick off goal checklists or bucket lists of trivialities.  What truly counts is the ability to master the right kind of big goals, by embedding your goals within your business vision and purpose.

Angela Brown Oberer said ‘You’ll never leave where you are until you decide where you would rather be’. Without knowing the purpose behind your goals and what the end result should look like, you’re stuck with objectives that don’t mean anything in the long run.

The harsh reality is that your true goals, the ones that are most important to you, take the most effort, dedication and sacrifice to achieve.

Your compelling why will allow you to endure the challenges and obstacles that are sure to arise. When others quit and give up, you will develop the agility, resilience and fortitude to keep going.

You can only accomplish those kinds of goals when you’re willing to question assumptions regularly and re-evaluate as necessary, so you achieve what counts in a handful of major elements that really matter.

Clarity of how

Bringing together clarity of vision, purpose and importance to then determine how you will approach your goal setting and achievement is the final step.

There are lots of goal setting frameworks such as SMART and OKR that turn the exercise into a process that’s easy to follow. However, you can easily follow the mantra of Steve Covey: Begin with the end in mind.

This reminds you to begin each day, task or project with a clear line of sight of your desired ultimate direction and destination. You then have to be agile enough to constantly flex and be proactive, which means as long as you are making the right things happen, you’re getting close to achieving your goals.

A personal mantra (what I live by) or a personal legacy vision statement (what people would say about me at my funeral) is a simple but powerful way for keeping you in check.

Clarifying the vision, the purpose, importance and method, helps to turn your goals in to actions.

 


Trent BartlettBy: TEC Chair, CEO mentor and coach Trent Bartlett

Building new vision for business in 2017

new-year-resolutions
Looking back over the year allows us the chance to put the year in perspective.

This year in particular perspective seems to be the operative word, with local decisions in the United Kingdom and United States having a ripple effect across the globe. These events have reminded me of the value of personal and business leadership, and the responsibility on the shoulders of those in leadership positions. Continue reading

5 steps to become a more effective leader

effective leadership

Leadership is no longer granted in a job title or organisational structure.  Effective leadership echoes in every interaction from your words, actions and even mannerisms. Infact, the opinions of customers, shareholders and suppliers all hinge on how a leader presents themselves. As such, the difference between an effective leader and one who’s struggling can shape an organisation. Continue reading

Coaching those who need it most…

Coaching those who need it most

People can face a crisis of confidence in the workplace often in spite of their actual ability. Thoughts such as “I’m not good enough to take on these responsibilities” or “I won’t draw attention by celebrating my achievements” or “I don’t deserve this – I’ll be found out soon” can plague people. Those thoughts indicate a lack of self-confidence that can be quite damaging both for careers as well as in the workplace generally. There is a name for it. It is known as imposter syndrome. Continue reading

Coming up to the next fork in your career road

Coming up to the next fork in your career road
There you were – engaged, challenged and fulfilled in your work that made the most of your innate talents and spoke to your passions and beliefs. You might have spent years developing a fully committed relationship with one of your closest friends – your job! Continue reading

Everyone wants to be an entrepreneur but not everybody has a plan

Everyone wants to be an entrepreneur

As news continues to break that Snapchat defied the odds and raised over $1.8 billion in funding, many people have been reminded of the money to be made in technology and other entrepreneurial start-ups. Continue reading